CLICK ON A SILHOUETTE OF THESE LIFFEY RIVERS IRISH DANCERS. MAKE PAPER DOLLS, DECORATIONS.
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"Each one is a delightful read for dancers, lovers of
Ireland and lovers of a good mystery, and a great way for
kids to learn a bit more about Irish and other cultures."
        
    AUTHOR INTERVIEW
"...all of you who enjoyed Nancy
Drew, Trixie Belden and Hardy Boys
stories as a child, you will really love
these books – even as an adult!"
         Maureen Smith
  Celtic Women International
BLOG

PLEASE DO NOT USE THESE DANCERS AS
YOUR LOGO. THEY ARE COPYRIGHTED.
HOWEVER, PRIVATE USE IS ENCOURAGED.
"Brenna Briggs writes with flair and        
passion, and her novels fill a        
yawning, gaping hole in literature  
for Irish-American girls. Write     
on, Ms. Briggs! We can't wait for  
the rest of Liffey's adventures!"
            BellaOnline
      Irish Culture Editor
CLICK ON BOOK COVERS
"The future is bright for Liffey
Rivers...
" March 2013 Issue


1842: Mineral Point, Wiskonsin Territory.
Following Irish immigrants, Paul and
Catherine Scott and their two children on
William Caffee's hanging day and its
aftermath.
  
    
Present: Irish dancer Liffey Rivers
ventures outside on the snowiest
November 1st in Mineral Point, WI's
history, to help her new friend, Susan
Scott, decipher a mysterious picture
puzzle. When a powerful wind
deposits a huge pile of snow in her
path, Liffey tries to do a leapover to
launch herself over it and discovers
that High Street has two sides: the
GRAY DOG SIDE and the RED
ROOSTER SIDE. Same direction. Very
different paths. The Mystery of the
Pointing Dog is Wisconsin historical
fiction, interwoven with Liffey Rivers’
most challenging and baffling mystery
to date
.



Hmmm.....
Five Liffey Rivers Irish Dancer Mysteries are here in the Irish
Traditional Music Archive
Taisce Cheol Dúchais Éireann. "It is a
national reference archive and resource centre for the traditional song,
instrumental music and dance of Ireland.
It is a public not-for-profit facility which is open, free of charge, to anyone with
an interest in the contemporary and historical artforms of Irish traditional
music. The Archive promotes public education in Irish traditional music
through its own activities and through partnerships with others.
Established in 1987, the Archive is the first body to be exclusively concerned
with the making of a comprehensive multimedia collection of materials –
sound recordings, books and serials, sheet music and ballad sheets,
photographs, videos and DVDs, etc. – for the appreciation and study of Irish
traditional music.

The Archive is situated at 73 Merrion Square, Dublin 2, with network-
connected work-stations in Dublin, Cork, Mayo and Donegal. It includes
public rooms for accessing and studying materials; specialist rooms for
digitising, conserving, cataloguing, and storing materials; and an audio and
video recording studio. A history of the two-hundred-year-old premises will be
found here/"